Feedback
News
Bill Cosby Scandal

Jury Hears Cosby’s Police Interview About Alleged Assault

Bill Cosby's description of his fateful encounter with Andrea Constand was read Thursday to the jury that will decide if he sexually assaulted her.

A transcript of his Jan. 26, 2005, police interview has long been public, but it was the first time jurors got to hear those words, read by a detective who investigated Constand's complaint.

Bill Cosby sexual assault trial: Accuser Andrea Constand testifies 2:23

Cosby said that on the night in question, he gave Constand one and a half Benadryl pills to help with "tension" before they began "touching and kissing." He claimed that Constand was conscious and didn't tell him to stop.

"I never intended to have sexual intercourse, like naked bodies, with Andrea," he said. "We are fully clothed, we are petting. I enjoyed it. And then I stopped and went up to bed. We stopped and then we talked."

Related: Which Celebs Are Showing Support in the Courtroom?

Constand, 44, gave a far different account to the jury earlier in the week, saying Cosby gave her pills that incapacitated her and then molested her — grabbing her breast, penetrating her with his fingers and making her fondle him while she was "frozen."

The long-married comic also told police that he and Constand had a "romantic" relationship that involved sexual contact before the alleged assault, while she says he only made "suggestive" advances that she easily fended off.

Image: Actor and comedian Bill Cosby leaves with Sheila Frazier, John Atchison and publicist Andrew Wyatt after the third day of Cosby's sexual assault trial at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown
Actor and comedian Bill Cosby leaves court with Sheila Frazier, John Atchison and publicist Andrew Wyatt. Brendan McDermid / Reuters

The defense has labored to portray their meetings as intimate and has zeroed in on gifts exchanged and dozens of phone calls after the 2004 incident.

On Thursday, Cosby attorney Brian McMonagle showed the phone records to Detective Richard Schaffer, directing him to calls made Feb. 14, 2004.

"We can see the phone calls that are coming in can't we?" McMonagle asked. "Its pretty clear on Valentine's Day there are phone calls being placed from Ms. Constand to Mr. Cosby, correct?"

"Yes," the detective answered.

A prosecutor then pointed out that Constand, who was then the director of operations for women's basketball at Temple University, had also made calls that day to the team coach.

"What do you think coach and Andrea talked about on Valentine's Day," Montgomery County District Attorney Stewart Ryan said.

"I would venture a guess — basketball," Schaffer said.

Related: First Cosby Witness Tells Tearful Story on Stand

After the 2005 police investigation, the DA declined to prosecute Cosby. Constand sued him and settled out of court.

But after dozens of women started coming forward with accusations of sexual misconduct against Cosby two years ago, the prosecutor's office decided to take another look at the case and charged the star with three counts of indecent aggravated assault.

Cosby has pleaded not guilty, denies all accusations and has sued some of the women for defamation. He faces 10 years in prison if convicted of assaulting Constand.